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Flying drones ‘for hobby’ won’t require you to get your drone approved with the FAA

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The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has finally come out with some clarity on where you can fly drones in the US.

The FAA announced a set of guidelines via social media that drone pilots should stick to if they’re not keen on getting into trouble. This should come as a relief to hobbyists that have been troubled by the recent advancements in the drone-related legalities.

Other countries lagging behind drone laws are expected to follow suit.

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Quoting from the FAA notice:

Having fun means flying safely! Hobby or recreational flying doesn’t require FAA approval but you must follow safety guidelines. Any other use requires FAA authorization.

Avoid doing anything hazardous to other airplanes or people and property on the ground.

“Dos”

  • Do fly a model aircraft/UAS at the local model aircraft club
  • Do take lessons and learn to fly safely
  • Do contact the airport or control tower when flying within 5 miles of the airport
  • Do fly a model aircraft for personal enjoyment

“Don’ts”

  • Don’t fly near manned aircraft
  • Don’t fly beyond line of sight of the operator
  • Don’t fly an aircraft weighing more than 55 lbs unless it’s certified by an aeromodeling community-based organization
  • Don’t fly contrary to your aeromodeling community-based safety guidelines
  • Don’t fly model aircraft for payment or commercial purposes

Earlier, the FAA had announced that every drone being bought in the US was to be registered with the authority, causing an uproar in the drone community.

More information can be found on the FAA website, accessible via the source link at the end of this article.

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  • 24strand

    So less than a month later, they go back and say you must register your drone, quadcopter if it ways more than 250 gms, are they high?

    • Indeed. It’s not just the FAA but almost every other regulatory authority dealing in drones. They find themselves in a tough situation right now.