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Eachine’s first outing with the fiercely-cute looking Assassin 180 didn’t go as per plan, with early reviews bashing the inadequate 6A ESCs that it shipped with. Come H2 2016, Eachine fixed it by upgrading the ESCs to 12A — giving the quadcopter enough room to work full force.

I got hold of the Assassin 180 after customs let it through somehow. That’s a story for another day, though.

We were sent the ARF version (what does ARF mean?) which costs $169 of the Eachine Assassin 180 FPV V2 quadcopter drone. This means that there was only the quadcopter in the package and nothing else (besides the battery and other peripheral), and I had to supply my own transmitter and receiver (which turned out to be a little tricky for me — update coming soon!).

The Assassin 180 FPV V2 quadcopter measures 180 x 128 x 74 mm, making it quite a small FPV flier. It comes with quite a powerful FPV transmitter too — a 5.8GHz 600mW one.

The Naze32 is mounted on a top plate, with the GPS module now moved at the back.

The famous headlights of the Racer 250 also make it to the Assassin 180. Let me tell you, these are BRIGHT!

The power distribution board, ESCs, Vtx, and other electrical components are integrated on a separate glass fiber plate. This might not sound like a great idea, but considering that the Assassin 180 FPV V2 quadcopter is mainly an FPV explorer (than an FPV racer), this could make sense.

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The battery that comes with the Assassin 180 FPV V2 quadcopter is what Eachine calls a ‘smart battery’. In essence, it’s a 11.1V 3S 1000mAh LiPo with a claimed flight time of 7 to 9 minutes which isn’t too bad considering that the 180mm aircraft weighs 288g (according to the manufacturer).

The motors that power the Assassin 180 FPV V2 quadcopter are 1806 2300KV ones, supplied with 4-inch propellers. There’s no branding on the motors as well as the props, but you should be able to swap the supplied ones for aftermarket props.

Moving on, another structural and material-related issue happens to be the the lower part of the aircraft. The Assassin 180 FPV V2 has a plastic battery bay that is susceptible to opening up (and thus flinging the battery out) after the minor-est of crashes. This according to me is something that deserves a second look. Not only that, the battery cage itself is made out of fairly low-grade plastic (in comparison to the rest of the aircraft).

So far, the pros and cons for me have been the following:

Pros

  • All in one solution
  • Powerful Vtx
  • Tiltable camera

Cons

  • Proprietary battery
  • Weak battery bay
  • Looks extremely prone to damage by moisture

The Eachine Assassin 180 FPV V2 quadcopter drone is available here for $169. (Also check Amazon)

It seems as though Eachine have ironed out most issues on the Assassin 180 FPV but left a few in there. However, we’ll know about the severity of these in the coming days, stay tuned. Meanwhile, you can let us know about any questions or doubts that you have about the Assassin 180 FPV V2 — we’ll be glad to answer. 🙂

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Eachine Assassin 180 FPV V2 Photos

Unboxing

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Battery

The battery has a proprietary connector and a button on it that upon pressing displays the available charge.

Assassin 180 FPV V2 Quadcopter

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Eachine Assassin 180 FPV V2 25

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More

or Amazon